Executive Summary

Measure K is the most important greenbelt policy measure in Sonoma County in decades. 

Sonoma County Community Separators Interactive Map

Measure K – the Community Separator Protection Ordinance – will renew voter protections for community separators for another 20 years.  Measure K will protect a total of 53,576 acres of open space and farm lands from subdivision and sprawl.

Measure K costs taxpayers nothing to keep our county beautiful!

THE PURPOSE OF COMMUNITY SEPARATORS IS THREE-FOLD

Protect rural open space and farm lands
Maintain community identities
Prevent sprawl

Measure K requires only a simple majority to pass. But more than 70% of the county voters approved voter protections for community separators when originally adopted in 1996. Recent polling suggests that county voters remain strongly in favor.

Click on image to open scalable map. Click on image to open scalable map.

VOTE YES ON MEASURE K!

  • Measure K protects open space and farm lands surrounding our cities and towns
  • Measure K keeps our rural landscape free from sprawl
  • Measure K costs taxpayers nothing to keep our county beautiful
  • Measure K renews voter protections for community separators for another 20 years
  • Measure K prevents rural subdivisions that are far from city services, and costs voters nothing!
  • Measure K supports agriculture and current land use
  • Measure K is endorsed by county supervisors, city councils, conservationists, farmers, housing advocates and many community leaders

Read more about Community Separators

WHAT IS AN URBAN GROWTH BOUNDARY?

Urban Growth Boundaries combined with Community Separators form the backbone of city-centered growth policies in Sonoma County. It has enabled our county to hold back sprawl and prevented us from making the mistakes made in other parts of the Bay Area.

An urban growth boundary (UGB) is a planning tool for cities and towns that identifies the extent of where we locate our homes, schools, and businesses. A UGB separates an urban area from its surrounding greenbelt of natural and agricultural lands, and helps encourage compact, walkable development, especially near transit. UGBs are set for significant periods of time—typically 20 years or more. In Sonoma County, it’s a proven tool to prevent urban sprawl.

 

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